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Tag Archives: mending

Mending by the Artist to Inspire

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Some art to inspire mending…

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“Make Do and Mend”
Screen printed limited edition by Clare Owen

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“Mending Dress” 1904
at Old Picture of the Day

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“Mending”
at Dove Grey Reader

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“Girl Mending” by Edmund Tarbell circa 1910
courtesy of The Athenaeum

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“Mending” by Daniel Garber
courtesy of The American Gallery

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“Woman Mending Clothing While Sitting in a Chair”
courtesy of Clip Art Etc

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“Love is the Thread”
courtesy of NotOnTheHighStreet.com

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More Mending

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A follow up to my previous mending post,

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origin unknown

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origin unknown

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French Mending from Mrs Easton

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Make Do and Mend from Coletterie

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origin unknown

Mending – A forgotten art!

Found some lovely instances of mending – an absolute necessity for the slow wardrobe.

Enjoy :)

by Corinne on exhibition in Mending My Ways

Wolplamuur by Heleen Klopper

Kapital by The Bandanna Almanac

Worth fighting for. Mending is for things worth fighting for, don’t give up without a struggle.

How to Mend Knits at Martha Stewart

Kleidersachen on Tumblr

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Daniel Jasiak on Tumblr

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mending, again. by Shibori Girl

Slow Wardrobe Inspiration – Boro

A little slow wardrobe inspiration.

Silk and cotton han juban with some hemp thread stitching from Sri Textilles, New York

Silk and cotton han juban with some hemp thread stitching from Sri Threads, New York

 When most people see a rip or hole in their clothing they immediately discard it, viewing the item as no longer fit to wear.

Hand Stitched Sashiko Farmer's Boro Jacket, handspun and hand-loomed cotton fabrics, early 1900s From Kimonoboy.com

Hand Stitched Sashiko Farmer’s Boro Jacket, handspun and hand-loomed cotton fabrics, early 1900s
From Kimonoboy.com

For the peasants in Japan a couple hundred years ago this was not an option. Clothing was simply too valuable to discard because of a hole.

Rag sellers would travel through rural Japan selling bits and scraps of cotton. The women of farming and fishing families would purchase these scraps and use them to mend their homespun items.

Patch over patch, stitch over stitch, generation passing on to generation.

A sleeping kimono intended for warmth - often lined and stuffed with okuso, the leftovers from the hemp yarn making process. Used like a duvet. From Sri Textiles, New York

A sleeping kimono intended for warmth – often lined and stuffed with okuso, the leftovers from the hemp yarn making process. Used like a duvet.
From Sri Threads, New York

Boro comes from the “mottainai” sensibility, or the idea that the object is too good to waste.

Boro Shimacho

Boro Shimacho – Strips of cloth stitched into an old ledger for boro inspiration.
From Sri Threads

How long will your clothing last?

Antique kimono, boro mending with sashiko stitch

Antique kimono, boro mending with sashiko stitch

For more information and examples of Boro

http://threads.srithreads.com/?s=history+of+boro

http://www.kimonoboy.com/short_history.html